The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living: How a Spending Fast Helped Me Get from Broke to Badass in Record Time

As Seen on Good Morning AmericaPopular blogger Anna Newell Jones of AndThenWeSaved delivers this self help manifesto that reveals how a spending fast will help you get on the road to living debt free.In 2009, young photographer Anna Newell Jones was rapidly suffocating under the weight of too much debt An inveterate spender, she was in way over her head, to the tuAs Seen on Good Morning AmericaPopular blogger Anna Newell Jones of AndThenWeSaved delivers this self help manifesto that reveals how a spending fast will help you get on the road to living debt free.In 2009, young photographer Anna Newell Jones was rapidly suffocating under the weight of too much debt An inveterate spender, she was in way over her head, to the tune of almost 24,000 She knew her debt was only going to get worse if she didn t take action, but she didn t know where to look for help On a whim, Anna decided to go on a spending fast an idea she heard in passing but knew little about Creating her own method, she learned what worked and what didn t and wrote about it on her blog, AndThenWeSaved Amazingly, Anna was able to eliminate all 23,605.10 of her debt in only 15 months She was interviewed in Forbes, Self, Glamour, Good Housekeeping, and the Chicago Tribune.Anna s journey inspired people and showed them that they too could change the way they dealt with their own money woes The Spender s Guide To Debt Free Living takes readers through a detailed step by step plan on how to do a Spending Fast and get out of debt, including Creating a personalized Debt Free Life Pledge.Understanding where your money is going when you re in debt, and where it will come from to pay it off.Learning why putting money into a savings account before or while paying off debt may not be the best idea for you.Finding additional income sources and generating side gigs.Re integrating spending into your life once you re out of debt, so that you stay out of debt.Filled with do it yourself ideas, insight from experts, and tons of motivational tips and real life practical advice, The Spender s Guide to Debt Free Living proves that you don t have to win the lottery or get a new job to change your life.
The Spender s Guide to Debt Free Living How a Spending Fast Helped Me Get from Broke to Badass in Record Time As Seen on Good Morning AmericaPopular blogger Anna Newell Jones of AndThenWeSaved delivers this self help manifesto that reveals how a spending fast will help you get on the road to living debt free

  • Title: The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living: How a Spending Fast Helped Me Get from Broke to Badass in Record Time
  • Author: Anna Newell Jones
  • ISBN: 9780062367181
  • Page: 272
  • Format: Paperback
    • Free Read [Science Fiction Book] ☆ The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living: How a Spending Fast Helped Me Get from Broke to Badass in Record Time - by Anna Newell Jones Û
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      Posted by:Anna Newell Jones
      Published :2019-03-14T02:10:51+00:00

    About the Author

    Anna Newell Jones

    Anna Newell Jones Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living: How a Spending Fast Helped Me Get from Broke to Badass in Record Time book, this is one of the most wanted Anna Newell Jones author readers around the world.

    273 Comment

    • Beth Enman said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      As a twenty-something with student loan debt and a yes-I've-heard-everything-there-is-to-hear-about-budgets attitude, this book was a refreshing and convicting readE GOOD:The plan as a whole, even though most people probably won't go to the extreme of completely needs-only spending as she did. It involves researching one's debts and assets so that the "if I ignore it, it isn't a problem" excuse no longer applies. We then create a debt hit list, prioritizing those with high interest and/or emotio [...]

    • Jen Hand said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Impractical advice for reasonable living. As a business manager, I believe her feast or famine perspective is exactly the kind of unhealthy thought pattern which gets people into serious debt in the first place. Also, the catastrophizing around student loans (income based repayment, guys. There's very little stress there now.) and no-interest family loans alongside minimal credit debt (seriously, she had $20k total debt the "majority of which was student loans") makes me believe that this author [...]

    • Rose said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Quick review for a quick read. I really enjoyed Anna Newell Jones's "The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living". It was a combination of her personal story paired alongside financial advice for the reader in the realm of personal finance/debt management. The way she writes the book is personable and encourages sticking to a habitual commitment, though it also focuses on involving others in holding a person to their commitment to be on a spending fast/getting their finances in order (which may or m [...]

    • Janet said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I confess that, when I read books like this, I usually just read the author's instructions ("write down all your expenses for the month"), lying to myself the whole time: "Oh, I'll do that part later"But, with this book, I actually followed the writer's instructions most of the way through. I haven't begun a spending fast (yet), but I've already gotten a better idea of where my hard-won cash is going each month and how I can reign it in.

    • Stephanie said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I really needed and liked this book, the only reason I took off a star was because quite a few of the websites listed in the book don't exist anymore. It's only a year old and already outdated!

    • Dawn CM said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I read this for motivation really, not as a how-to. It did inspire me to stop wanting all of the things, so mission accomplished. A quick, good read.

    • Kirsty said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Still not 100% why I picked this up as i'm not the target audience (i'm not currently in debt).The cover was bright, it was on the new book stand at the library.Anyway this did have some good tips about spending on needs vs wants and resisting the urge to spend ridiculous amounts of money on things you will never use.

    • Michelle Gray said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I liked her sound advice and her ability to talk about both her successes and failures.

    • Ajeet Dhyan said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      This book missed the mark for me. The Tuesday Bassen artwork initially caught my eye, and like many others, I am a young person struggling to juggle paying off student debt while living my life, who also needs to learn more about personal finance. The intended audience is definitely "female millenial;" the book is quite conversational and an easy read.The author's recommendations are hit and miss for me. To elaborateI think shifting to a more abundant or grateful mindset may help you be just as [...]

    • Philip Athans said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      What made me most happy about this book is that it reinforced for me a lot of the things I've already been doing while at the same time providing a bit of a surge of encouragement to increase my efforts with a few new ideas. If you've allowed the evil of debt into your life, this is a great place to start pushing it out.

    • Bradley said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      As a guy who carries a lot of debt and is working on paring it down I found this book to be a refreshing take on money matters. I'm definitely going to incorporate the author's ideas into my life.

    • Edina said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      We've already been debt-free but I still liked some little tid-bits in this. Good reminder.

    • Allison Hiltz said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Not long ago, I sat down and had a chat with the financial advisor we have access to through work. I’ve always been wary of financial advisors because they oftentimes give advice based on what will make them money but because ours has a fiduciary responsibility, I decided to see what he had to say. The conversation was a bit worrisome because although I’m on the right track with regard to retirement, I’m also well-versed in the changing retirement landscape and know that today’s money w [...]

    • Paul Stuart said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I'm giving it 2 stars instead of 1 for the helpful tips on how to lower your expenses, save money, encouragement to have side-hustles, etc. Those sections are really the only reason I wanted to read this book, so I was frustrated to see about 25% of the entire book was devoted to practicality. This is geared toward "shopaholic" personality types, and if that is you, then you may find it more beneficial since the majority of the book is geared toward the psychology and spirituality behind materia [...]

    • Busy said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I did the KonMari thing to my house which caused me to rethink my relationship with objects. Now I'm going to try this to rethink my relationship to spending money. I do a lot of things right- I know the market, KonMari helped me to know what I own and be able to keep track of things so I don't overbuy or buy duplicates, and I have a few good thrifty tricks up my sleeve, but I come from a family of convenience buyers and impulse shoppers, of gadget lovers and admirers of shiny objects and trends [...]

    • Amanda Perkins said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      This is more of a 2.5 star book. I liked the first two chapters and was intrigued—I too make weird rationalizations to buy things so her self-descriptions of her own thinking and behavior were relatable—but things went downhill from there. Jones’ budgeting style stressed me out just reading about it: she chose to save nothing and zeroed out her bank account every paycheck. WHO DOES THIS? The idea is ludicrous to me as one of my own spending triggers is having no money to fall back on. (The [...]

    • Brenda said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      In The Spender's Guide to Debt-Free Living, the author Anna Newell Jones walks us through her solution to reducing debt when a traditional budget didn't work for her. Instead Jones takes us on a one year spending fast. While the journey she takes does seem to the extreme, I found it inspiring and saw areas in my own life that reflect behaviors that she shares in her book. One of my biggest takeaways was to re-evaluate my own relationship with money, as Jones highlights how the quick thrill of a [...]

    • ☽ ellie ♔ bear ☾ said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Skimmed in a night. I think there was some solid nuggets of information in here for folks who are just beginning their financial do's/don'ts journey. I like that Jones was very transparent about her struggle, her finances, her lack of background in finance, and everything in-between. There didn't appear to be any secret sources of income (trust fund or wall street earning job), so the every day person can see their struggles and triumphs via Jones' methodologies and hopefully become inspired by [...]

    • Barbara said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I love this book! The strategies and advice are spot-on for me. The author gives sound advice from the perspective of how to go about getting out of debt, saving for a particular item, saving once out of debt, maintaining the newly acquired debt-free lifestyle, plus loads of other advice, ideas and suggestions.There's a common-sense approach to this methodology without it being austere (though you can make your plan austere if you wish). I've even started applying these ideals to non-monetary ar [...]

    • Georgia said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      This book could be better for other people who are heavier spenders and don't already have a lot of ideas about how to pare down spending and save money. I'm already a pretty big cheapskate, lol. That being said, I do think there are places where I could cut back, and I love the idea of a spending fast. I definitely see myself participating in one within the coming months, even if just for a short time, to see if I can dent my debt.

    • Ingrid said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Maybe more like 3.5? I have read a lot of the author's blog so much of this wasn't brand new info but I feel like reading this was really motivational and has spurred me to take some of my own financial goals more seriously. It's US-centric like a lot of these sorts of resources, which makes a lot of it not so relevant to me. Even so I like the way it's written and can relate to a fair bit of it!

    • Beth said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      I didn't technically finish the entire book but I got through most of it. Some of the detailed lists caused me to lose interest. However I loved the main thesis. I was challenged to examine my relationship with spending and recognize that it's not always healthy. I have continued to identify my "needs" vs. "wants" and to rule out a majority of unnecessary spending. This has been a very healthy exercise for me!

    • Du said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      It's a fine book. The author's story and the way she tells it are good, but otherwise it is not something I'd reach for as a tome. The plan behind the debt free way is a pretty solid and well known plan (figure out wants and needs, spend on needs, use the wants money to pay down debt). It makes sense, but is hard to do. I am not sure the hard to do part is communicated here.

    • Linda said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      This book is good in that reality tv, i-lost-half-my-body-weight diet specials way. This extreme no spend plan for saving money is inspiring but I'm guessing most people will be unable to keep it up for the same reason people fall off diets. It did make for a good read. The author's chatty tone made the book feel like the print version of a fun talk show.

    • Becky Gust said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      This was the first book that actually got me excited about learning more on how to get my personal finances under control. Since reading this book, I've sat down with my husband and we've come up with a game plan on how to pay off our outstanding debt. This book was full of practical advice. I would highly recommend this book!

    • Alessandra said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      It's a practical finance self-help book, not great literature so it's hard for me to give it more than 3 stars (which means readable but not something I'd recommend to everyone in my rating system). Many good tips in here and some good food for thought on how to approach day-to-day situations differently.

    • Yureli Castillo said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      She offers some really great tips on going "scorched earth." I don't think that this is for everyone, she is pretty extreme. If you are looking to make some extreme changes, then this is the book for you. If you aren't looking for complete "rice & beans," take her ideas and implement a few. She also explains some options for adding extra income.

    • Christy said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Definitely some sound-seeming strategies for saving money and paying down debt, but some parts seemed extreme to me. However, a person who is really desperate to get out of debt and has collectors calling daily might not find it so extreme. I also liked that the author touched on how her mindset changed through the experiment and her newfound appreciation for living more simply.

    • Bonnie G. said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      It's a solid, before bed time read. She is a fun writer and it flowed well, but it was far more a memoir than a real plan of attack for me. I like tables and charts and grids and numbers- this was more of an approach or philosophy

    • Alison said:
      Jun 20, 2019 - 02:10 AM

      Listening to the audiobook. Too many references to websites in which the addresses are spoken out one . and \ at a time. Just put that stuff in the enhanced part. I also don't need the name of her blog over and over again. I think a lot of the material was rehashed in later chapters.

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